Women and children targeted for immigration service abuse

There is a real blood-boiler in today’s Guardian, Women and Children First by Natasha Walter, in which she explains how the immigration services seem to be targeting women and children for deportation and abuse. A few points stick out from this article: Continue reading

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Neo-Nazis on the web

An interesting piece was published in the “Online” supplement of today’s Guardian - Fear and Loathing, by Nick Ryan, about hate material on the web and the violence and intimidation organised over the Internet. It also mentions the policy of the British far right to contact the media without revealing one’s affiliations, which the author says began with Nick Griffin’s takeover of the British National Party in 1999. (I mention this because some of the callers to a certain London talk show displayed views suspiciously close to those of the BNP, especially their open hostility to Muslims. Insha Allah perhaps I might mention this article to Jon Gaunt or Eddie Nestor next time one of these bigots uses the BBC to spout their hatred.)

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The “frontline” for Muslim women: West Virginia

The argument between the Indian “Muslim feminist” Asra Q. Nomani and her local mosque committee in Morgantown, WV, has somehow made it onto the BBC’s news website: “US Muslim woman defies hardliners”. The pictures on this report undermine any claim Nomani might have to be in a position to challenge Muslim ulama: for one thing, she does not even dress like a Muslim woman. According to this report, her dispute with the local “mullahs” comes from her entering the mosque through the front door and praying alongside the men, which has apparently started “heated discussions” in the US Muslim community. Continue reading

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Sometimes a “turnoff” is a good thing

A lot of our ‘ulama’ say that TV is haraam for various reasons, and the harm exposure to it causes children is not in much doubt. I just found this interesting piece on why it’s best not to let your kids watch it. (You’ll need to register - it’s free.)

(Then again, at the end of the article it suggests that a “kinder, gentler approach” is to switch off the TV as soon as it “misbehaves”. I really don’t think that letting your kids watch a bit of a program and then suddenly turning it off in the middle when you see something you don’t like is a good idea. It’s kinder, for the children, not to allow them to watch it at all.)

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“Honour killings” story a hoax!

Not for the first time, the media in the west have been taken in by an anti-Muslim hoax perpetrated by a middle-eastern non-Muslim. First it was Jean Sasson, now it’s Norma Khoury, who put out a book on a supposed “honour killing” in Jordan. This piece in the Jordan Times points out a series of factual errors which demonstrate the author’s ignorance of Jordan, which is not surprising given that she left the country when she was three years old. She is an American citizen who also has a Greek passport. Continue reading

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The Protocols of the Elders of New Orleans

The Southern Poverty Law Center reports that a group of veteran hate-mongers have met in New Orleans, among them David Duke and the founder of the British National Party, John Tyndall. Apparently they have agreed some sort of “protocol” to work together, and to “aim their hate at their real targets, not at each other, and to advance in unity their vision: a nation for white people” (these are the SPLC’s words, not the group’s). (Hat tip: Bohemian Mama.)

Continue reading

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So, it’s a new era for law and order …

As anyone reading the UK news might be aware, Tony Blair, hot on the heels of a not-so-good report on his grounds for taking us into war in Iraq, has announced some new plans for law and order which allegedly bring to an end to the so-called 1960s liberal consensus. Continue reading

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On recent Mac magazines …

In this country us Mac users have access to three major magazines: Mac Format, run by the same people as Linux Format, and their homepage is a month behind the actual magazine, as is the Linux Format page. Then there is Mac World, a sister paper to an American magazine of the same name, and Mac User. I buy the first two quite often, the last much less so. Continue reading

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Anti-Hadith liars are on the march again …

Yesterday I got an email from a sister in the USA who I am in regular contact with. Somebody has been posting anti-hadith propaganda to a sisters’ email forum she subscribes to, and she wanted advice on it. This particular tract can be found here at “Free-Minds, a place to discover Islam based on GOD Alone”. Notice the spelling of “GOD” in capital letters - typical of anti-hadith activists. Continue reading

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Shaikh Shaghouri obit

Islamica magazine has published an obituary of the great shaikh of Damascus, Abdul-Rahman al-Shaghouri, who passed away a few weeks ago (inna lillahi wa inna ilayhi raji’oon). Read it here.

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Just back from seeing Fahrenheit 9/11

This evening was the first I have spent at the cinema for many years - I haven’t been since I became Muslim (in 1998), and I don’t think I did for some years before that either. I don’t care much for the movie industry and the big money and other evils in it. I very nearly went to see Rabbit Proof Fence, about a mixed-race Australian girl who was kidnapped by the government to train to be a domestic skivvy, and escaped back to her home by following the rabbit-proof fence. (But her own daughter was kidnapped as well.) But I decided against it, because I didn’t care for the impotent rage these types of stories often produce in me (especially since that particular scandal has now ceased, along with the orphan-slavery the British perpetrated in the colonies by shipping out kids from care homes). Since this film is a documentary (or, as its detractors call it, a “crockumentary”) about how nasty Bush is, I decided I’d go and see this one. Continue reading

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The Al-Qaradawi controversy …

I’m sure nobody in the UK missed the controversy yesterday over Shaikh Yusuf al-Qaradawi who is currently in London to attend a number of meetings including with the Muslim Association of Britain and one in which the Mayor of London is to be present. The issue was whipped up by the tabloid press, notably the Scum who led with the headline “The Evil Has Landed”. The actual report was on page 2, as usual with political stories, right next to the topless bimbo on page 3. Continue reading

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Cursing the Darkness

Of late a number of websites have sprung up attacking a section of the British population they call “chavs”, which roughly equates to “white trash” (I’ve never heard black people being called this). I can’t remember ever hearing the term “chav” before this year until I saw references to a newspaper article about them, in which it was suggested that anti-chav feeling was just snobbery, and letters were published in response saying that no, it’s not just snobbery, these people are nasty, and they molest people and are sometimes violent. I did a Google search for the term chav, and one of the first sites to come up was one called ChavScum, which was then subtitled “A Humorous Guide to Britain’s Burgeoning Peasant Underclass” but which has since changed to “A User’s Guide to Britain’s New Ruling Class”. Continue reading

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Nick Cohen’s at it again …

We all know Nick Cohen as the opponent of the anti-war marches, who constantly alleged that the Stop the War coalition was an alliance of Marxists and religious reactionaries. Today in the New Statesman he calls for the government to ban ritual slaughter, because it’s cruel, so he says. (It doesn’t seem to be in the online edition.) He brings out government evidence that the animal feels pain and distress for the minute or so before it dies. Continue reading

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My own driving peeves

I’m sure most of you reading this has read Saraji’s driving peeves on her blog - and yesterday on my first driving trip up town for a while I was reminded of a few of mine. The trip yesterday started in Croydon, took in Dulwich, Peckham, Lewisham, Greenwich, Hackney, the King’s Cross area and Battersea. And it was one of those nasty Iveco trucks which I hate, complete with the stiff clutch which hurts the left knee. The cargo, at least, was tiles and tile-related gear, which is something which at least I have no objections to delivering.

Continue reading

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The state of US intelligence …

Time Magazine has published a feature on the US Homeland Security department’s “Highway Watch” scheme, in which professional drivers are being trained to inform the department of “suspicious” things they see on the highway via a toll-free number to a secret location: people taking pictures of bridges, people in clothing inappropriate for the weather, that sort of thing. The people who turned up at this meeting in Little Rock, Arkansas, walked in off the street without preregistering, and despite claims that volunteers must have clear records, the records are not vetted with by the trucking associations. Two of the volunteers claimed that it was easy to spot “Islamics” by their turbans, and the programme failed to point out that nearly all of the people who wear turbans in the USA are Sikhs, not Muslims, and that a Sikh truck driver was shot in a hate incident in Arizona last year. (Hat tip: CAIR)

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Why are computer books so expensive?

Today I took my usual weekend stroll through London, or rather, through the diminishing bookshop quarter of it around Charing Cross Road area since the local landlords (allegedly) priced the other companies out of the market in order to make more money off wine bars, etc. The two companies I am normally willing to buy books from are Foyles and Blackwell’s, and the first in particular has a department for computer books where the staff seem to know a little bit about what they are selling. Like, last week when they had their Wrox networking event, the guys mentioned a whole load of people who were coming, among them being the computer language expert Ivor Horton. And I said, like, anyone else coming? And they said basically that it was good enough that Horton was coming. Continue reading

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Good News: Crimean Tartars’ rights restored

Following on from CAIR’s occasional “Good News” features in their mailings, I’ve decided to do one of my own whenever a good news feature (or apparent good news feature) appears in the media. Today it’s about the Tartars of Crimea (a peninsula in the Black Sea which belongs to Ukraine but where the main language is Russian), whose rights have been restored for the first time since their deportation to Central Asia by Stalin according to this BBC report. The new law, awaiting signature by President Leonid Kuchma, will have the same rights over land, housing and work as other Ukrainians, and bans discrimination.

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So, we’re out at last

On past evidence I was pretty sure we were not going to make it to the finals of the current European championships (Euro 2004), and last night, if you hadn’t heard already, the English team were knocked out in the quarter-finals over a “penalty”. (For Americans, that means a one-on-one goal kick, which is used after the game itself fails to produce a winner.) Continue reading

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