Robert Spencer is still lying

Ginny posted yesterday about sitting in her family’s truck while they listened to the infamous Robert Spencer’s appearance on the Michael Savage show (see here). Ginny is of course not the first Muslim convert who has had to defend Islam from hostile relatives - a lot of non-Muslims (including several of my family) cannot fathom why someone would give up listening to music, for example. Spencer was trotting out verses from the Qur’an which supposedly justify the murder of Nick Berg. No doubt he took the verses out of context - this is, of course, standard Wahhabi practice whenever they want to call Muslims unbelievers, or kill non-Muslims they don’t have the right to kill.

But the fact is that there is no justification for the murder, which is why several Muslim organisations have condemned it (perhaps some of the ignorant fringe groups support it, but I haven’t heard about it). You can’t simply kill someone because he is a Jew, or because he has an Israeli stamp in his passport. There has been no suggestion that this man was even involved in combat of any sort, even as a “contractor”.

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Panorama scaremongering?

Did anyone else see that Panorama programme that was on BBC1 this evening? Did anyone else think this was a scare story? Even the Home Office refused to take part for precisely this reason. The scenario was of three bomb attacks on the London Tube (underground railway) system, and of an explosion in the City of London releasing a tanker full of chlorine into the air. Continue reading

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Mono

I’ve been thinking of starting a new sub-blog to cover my tech interests which are becoming more prominent in my life now that I’m about to start my college project (insha Allah). The last time I blogged on this subject I got a comment from someone who said she understood about every other word, and us geeks have a tendency to talk to each other in terminology others wouldn’t understand, and some of us have difficulty in talking clearly to people who don’t understand it. Earlier today I showed Lee, my cousin’s husband (who works in the IT industry) my laptop, on which I’d installed the Linux package I received last Wednesday. Continue reading

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Iraq abuse; Moore accusations

CNN reports that a former intelligence official has alleged that the recent abuse scandal in Abu Ghuraib prison was in fact the result of Donald Rumsfeld’s policy - not of the antics of a few misguided soldiers.

Meanwhile, Michael Moore has alleged in his appearance at the Cannes Film Festival that people from the White House and Republican Party had tried to stop his latest film being made or released. (I don’t much care for Michael Moore except for the fact that he is against Bush. As I believe I have said here before, his accusations could lead to a US attempt on Saudi Arabia if taken seriously - something no Muslim welcomes. But this accusation does not surprise me given the Bush government’s well-known corporate links.

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Piers Morgan resigns

The BBC is reporting that Piers Morgan, the editor of the Daily Mirror has been sacked or stepped down (nobody is quite sure which, which is the norm when powerful people are sacked), and that the photos they published under the claim that British troops were abusing Iraqi prisoners had been confirmed as fake, and that the paper had been the victim of a “malicious hoax”. Excuse me, but a well-known photographer was interviewed on BBC radio last week, and he said that he believed they were fake - they were too posed, and looked too good to be a furtive amateur job. Doesn’t this paper have people working for them who can tell these things about photographs?

The Daily Mirror has been trying to make its name as reporting “real news” and debunking the lies issued by the rest of the tabloid press, but the fact is that it is still a downmarket tabloid paper and is well-known for lapses into dreadful gutter journalism. Who can forget the notorious “Lady Di in the gym” pictures of 1994? By doing this they have brought the whole anti-war movement into disrepute.

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Well, my new Linux package is installed, and …

I’m pretty disappointed, actually. I’ve been using Linux as my main OS since about October 2002, and as I mentioned before I’ve used many Linux distros and always come back to SUSE. I think this may be the last time I pay for one of SUSE’s upgrades. Despite the obvious advantages of Linux from a security point of view, this is let down by the usability bugs which mar the user’s experience of their system. In fact, after Novell bought out SUSE a few months back I was hoping that they would iron out some of the serious bugs in the last version, like the one which would not let the user log in to anything except a plain terminal. I’ve not encountered that particular bug so far, but there are some new ones. Continue reading

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My SUSE arrived today!

Just taking a break from my revision (brushing up on my Java) to install the SUSE Linux package which was delivered this afternoon on two computers simultaneously … which should be done in about an hour insha Allah. The package was sent from Germany and appears to have been sent through the German postal system, which feeds into DHL in this country. Don’t you just hate it when you know you’ve got a parcel coming but have no way of finding out exactly where it is and when you are likely to get it? I rang DHL twice today, and the first time they said that there was no record of a parcel being sent from Germany to a name anything like mine in my postal area, and the second time, they said it could well be coming through Parcel Force! Then my dad told me that a card had been put through the door to say that the parcel had been left next door, when I was in all day!

Well, tonight, I intend to do some more Java on my laptop, downstairs with my mum and dad instead of up here in the computer room on my own … which probably means no blogging. (Some of the programs in this course probably won’t work on a Mac.) But I intend to post a full review here insha Allah.

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Red Hat could mean curtains for Windoze

An interview with Matthew Szulik of Red Hat has been published in today’s Independent. Red Hat has just issued another desktop version of its Linux desktop, which it will provide on a subscription basis to companies at $5 per month. This is the same company which last year killed off its standard Linux package, largely because most people who used it downloaded it from the Internet or bought books with a CD of the operating system inside. Despite the fact that Red Hat has the best looking (and most consistent) user interface around, its configuration programs have always been limited and unfriendly compared to SuSE’s YaST. Its Fedora Core 1 release had a quote of 192 Mb (megabytes) as a practical minimum for running a graphical desktop when 128Mb was well enough for me to run SuSE with all the trimmings. In fact, over the year and a half or so I’ve been using Linux, I’ve tried: Mandrake, Red Hat / Fedora, Libranet (“GNU/Linux bliss”, not!), FreeBSD, College Linux, of those I can remember, and I’ve always come back to SuSE. My copy of the latest version is (I hope) in the parcel delivery system somewhere between Asknet’s warehouse in Germany and a delivery depot somewhere here in London. I intend to publish my opinion here when I’ve taken it for a spin (insha Allah). As for Red Hat, if it drives Windoze out of the market, so much the better, because almost anything which runs on Red Hat’s Linux will run on SUSE’s anyway.

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I’m a better runaway than David Hargreaves

David Hargreaves recently told in the Spectator his story of how he ran away from boarding school in 1974, and he considers this one of the best moves he’s ever made. I was tempted to buy the magazine because of this article (registration required, it’s free), but then realised I could read it for free on the Internet, so I didn’t bother. (You can’t do that with the leftie equivalent, the New Statesman.) Continue reading

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‘Malware’, Microsoft and Open Source

Here is an interestng article on Groklaw about one Microsoft spokesman’s alleged recent comments about Linux and open source, and the cost of ‘malware’ (viruses etc) on Windows platforms including problems with Microsoft’s patches. I have to say I haven’t had any problems with MS’s patches, but I’ve also stopped connecting my laptop to the net when it’s running Windows. Despite having an anti-virus package I still managed to pick up several viruses, and it appears that clearing up my system necessitated getting rid of the main program for Visual Studio. It also speaks volumes about MS’s attitude when it insists on designing another proprietary operating system for its next release, when Unix is a proven, secure architecture, and freely obtainable off the net.

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Yet another twist in Schiavo story

CNN reports that a Florida county circuit court has struck down a law passed by the Florida legislature which prevents the husband having his wife’s life-support machine turned off. Continue reading

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Lying dogs whip up fears among Jews

OK … I don’t normally give free publicity to blogs which publish lies about Muslims, but this one from “Dhimmi Watch” really does take the proverbial biscuit. (You can read about this and its parent blog, “Jihad Watch”, at an earlier entry on this blog.) Apparently the “marvelous Nidra Poller” turned up in America recently with a scare story about how awful it is for Jews in France: Continue reading

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Sharon’s Banana Republics

Bush and Blair have allowed Israel to dictate their Middle East policy and carry out a Palestinian politicide, writes Ali Safieh, Palestinian General Delegate to the UK and the Vatican.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/comment/story/0,3604,1194704,00.html

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The strange case of the Muslim-loving Islamophobes

One of the fascinating things about some of the most vehemently anti-Islamic commentators in the blogosphere (they seldom make it into the mainstream press, at least not in the UK) is how concerned they appear for the welfare of certain groups of Muslims. Robert Spencer currently has two stories on Muslim women on his “Dhimmi Watch” blog. One of them is about the injuries recently revealed by the Saudi TV presenter (you can read the story on the BBC’s website here). This woman’s husband faces charges of attempted murder, but the problem of violence against women in some Arab countries is not in question, even within the Arab and wider Muslim community. “How many other cases like this have gone unreported and unnoticed?” asks the sanctimonious Spencer, despite the fact that western society has its own problems with wife-beating and rape. (The report also mentions the old chestnut about women not being able to drive or vote in Saudi; in fact, Saudi is not a democracy, and nobody can vote, and women not being able to drive is local law, which isn’t followed by Muslims outside Saudi.) Continue reading

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Mercury, Vitamin A and the MMR vaccine

I’m not a parent myself, but I’ve been following the coverage of the issue of the MMR vaccine in the UK especially as it has come up on a Muslim eGroup I subscribe to. I am not a diehard anti-vaccine activist, but it stands to reason that if you inject known toxic substances into someone’s body, especially a young child’s, that it will do them harm. Continue reading

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Reaction to Rantisi murder

Israel’s assassination yesterday of yet another Hamas leader was shocking, but it should not surprise anyone that Israel, especially under the leadership of Ariel Sharon, would do such a thing. I haven’t bothered to look on LGF to check if they are crowing about the murder; the BBC, however, has opened up one of its “Have Your Say” pages and the predictable reactions from diaspora Jews are there for all to see. I shan’t bother posting them here, as you can read them on the BBC’s website. But it is interesting how diaspora Jews praise their country’s war criminal leader for fighting terrorism, by shooting at people from helicopters, while ignoring the terrorism committed by their nation’s founders like Begin, Shamir and Rabin. Continue reading

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So, it’s almost St. George’s day …

I don’t honestly know if it’s nearly St. George’s day, but it must be because people have brought it up on the radio again: why don’t we English celebrate our “national day” like the Welsh and the Irish celebrate theirs? As a Muslim, of course, St. George and his day don’t mean much to me, but I suspect that the reason we don’t make much of it is because we don’t need to. The English have never considered their culture to be under threat, or cared much about it, unlike the Celts who have seen their languages, for example, all but disappear. (Welsh is hanging on, just, but Gaelic is now confined to the distant west of both Ireland and Scotland.) Continue reading

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More on that Boudreaux pic

A while ago I posted a picture here I got from CAIR about a Marine (or ex-Marine) standing with two Iraqi boys with a sign saying “Lcpl Boudreaux killed my Dad, then he knocked up my sister!”. Knocked-up means made her pregnant, by the way. No-one is suggesting that he actually did what it says on the sign, because he’d have some difficulty getting smiles and thumbs up from the two lads if he really had killed their dad and raped their sister. But others have suggested that the sign has been doctored. Others disagree, including myself. Here’s why: Continue reading

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More on Sardar

The New Statesman finally got round to printing replies to Ziauddin Sardar’s “open the gates of ijtihad” waffle two issues ago (I blogged on this about a week ago). They didn’t print mine, but they did print one from Angela Pinter of east London, who makes a number of accusations against Islam and Muslims:

Continue reading

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‘Shaikh’ Abdul-Qadir’s latest essay

I subscribe to a number of Yahoo groups on Islam and Bewleyupdates is one of them. The group was founded by Aisha Bewley, best known for her translation of the Qur’an, Qadi Iyaad’s Shifaa, Imam Malik’s Muwatta, and a number of Sufi texts including Imam al-Darqawi’s letters. I find it generally to be a very useful group, and it’s not moderated which means it’s not subject to the delays sometimes experienced by subscribers to Mas’ud Khan’s Al-Zawiya forum. It’s generally a very moderate Ahlus-Sunnah forum. Continue reading

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